Impeachment Trial Moves forward Amidst Uncertainty

Jack Barker, Sports Editor

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On Dec. 18, President Donald Trump became only the third president next to Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton to be impeached.

In the U.S. Constitution, one must be guilty of “treason, bribery or other high crimes and misdemeanors” in order to be impeached. If a president is considered to have committed one of these crimes, the house will decide whether to impeach.

In Trump’s case, the house has decided that he is guilty of one of the crimes listed previously and voted to impeach. He was specifically charged with obstruction of justice and abuse of power. In the house, a majority vote is needed to impeach, while in the senate a two-thirds majority is needed to successfully remove the sitting president.

The impeachment process began in early September when an “unnamed intelligence official” wrote a letter that showed concern with a phone call Trump had with Ukrianian President Volodolmyr Zelensky back in July of 2019, according to an article by the BBC.

A transcript would later show that Trump urged Zelensky to investigate deeper into allegations against candidate Joe Biden and his son Hunter. Soon after, Trump would go on to block millions of dollars in military aid to Ukraine, according to the BBC.

Although two of the articles have been voted on, they have yet to be sent to Congress, where a trial will begin once they’re received.

Senator Josh Hawley of Missouri said, “Now [Nancy Pelosi] wants to prevent a Senate trial, perhaps indefinitely. But the Constitution gives the Senate sole power to adjudicate articles of impeachment, not the House,” according to Fox News.

Nancy Pelosi, the Speaker of the House continues to hold onto the impeachment articles, but right now people can only speculate as to why she is, according to The Hill.

Pelosi went on to say, “The GOP Senate must immediately proceed in a manner worthy of the Constitution and in light of the gravity of the President’s unprecedented abuses,” according to Bloomberg.

The impeachment trials will continue as we have entered the new year. As for now, no one is sure if we are going to have a removal of a president for the first time.