MLB: Should an Electronic Strike Zone be Adopted?

Sam Lance, Sports Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






It’s a common theme in major league baseball today. The slight pause of disbelief after a ball is called a strike. Or the screaming at an umpire that ends up getting you fined and ejected.

During a Red Sox playoff game on October 9 manager John Farrell was ejected, and second basemen Dustin Pedroia was nearly ejected for arguing over balls and strikes. The pitch tracks on the TV screen showed their argument was valid… the ball was way outside.

This isn’t the first time something of this nature has happened in the major leagues, so a question has been proposed. Should baseball move toward a consistent electronic strike zone?

Chicago Cubs player Ben Zobrist sure thinks so. During a game with the Diamondbacks, Zobrist was called out on strikes on a ball nearly in the dirt, and he expressed his anger after the game.

“We’re going to have to have an electronic strike zone because human beings make mistakes,” Zobrist said. “When you start ending games and games turn on one pitch like that. It’s an unfortunate situation, and now that we have the technology, we should probably get it right.”

There are many problems in baseball. Pace of play, racial diversity in the front office, and minor league salaries are all issues, but most are commonly disagreed on by players.

According to ESPN’s Buster Olney, the issue of balls and strikes and adding an electronic strike zone is agreed upon by players.

One player told Olney that the electronic strike zone would even speed up the pace of play because there would be no argument about what was a ball or a strike.

However, many EHS students disagree with the electronic strike zone.

“It would cost a lot of money,” said junior Jake Wilkinson, a passionate baseball fan. “There could be malfunctions and it wouldn’t detect foul tips.”

Another EHS student and member of the baseball team, Bryce Henry, also disagrees.

“It would take away the excitement of the game and it would be too precise,” he said. “One of the most exciting parts of the game is ejections.”

Still, people like sportswriter for the Detroit Tigers Brandon Day, think the change is necessary.

“It’s time to give in to the inevitable and prepare to implement an automated strike zone,” he said.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • MLB: Should an Electronic Strike Zone be Adopted?

    News

    Theater Arts Students Play Dead for CSI Lab

  • MLB: Should an Electronic Strike Zone be Adopted?

    Sports

    Tiger Football Defeats Minooka, Will Host State Semifinals

  • A&E

    Concerts Canceled in St. Louis Following Protests

  • MLB: Should an Electronic Strike Zone be Adopted?

    Sports

    Injury Benches Rodgers for Season

  • MLB: Should an Electronic Strike Zone be Adopted?

    News

    Journalism State Winners Write Futures

  • MLB: Should an Electronic Strike Zone be Adopted?

    Sports

    Smith Switches Recruiting Sport, Secures Several Offers

  • MLB: Should an Electronic Strike Zone be Adopted?

    Sports

    Cheer Springs from Sectionals to State

  • MLB: Should an Electronic Strike Zone be Adopted?

    News

    Health Occupations Club Dresses Up, Raises Funds for HOSA

  • MLB: Should an Electronic Strike Zone be Adopted?

    Sports

    Tigers Win First Game of Tournament, Move on to Semifinals

  • MLB: Should an Electronic Strike Zone be Adopted?

    Sports

    Epenesa to Take Break From the Court, Return to the Turf

MLB: Should an Electronic Strike Zone be Adopted?