EHS Band Returns to Full Season

Senior+Jack+Busse%2C+junior+Will+Dorsey%2C+senior+Carter+Schwalb%2C++sophomore+Sam+Vuagniaux+and+senior+Kaleb+Hollis+perform+in+the+percussion+line+during+the+band%27s+exhibition+on+Aug.+6.+The+show%2C+titled+%22Carnival+Mystique%2C%22+will+be+performed+at+several+competitions+this+season.

Mason Kane

Senior Jack Busse, junior Will Dorsey, senior Carter Schwalb, sophomore Sam Vuagniaux and senior Kaleb Hollis perform in the percussion line during the band’s exhibition on Aug. 6. The show, titled “Carnival Mystique,” will be performed at several competitions this season.

Rachel Piazza, Staff Writer

It’s sixth hour and the majority of EHS students are sitting in their sixth-hour classes, trying to keep their eyes open and survive the last hour of school for the day. 

Meanwhile, band students stand outside in the 90-degree heat, practicing their pieces for upcoming performances on the field.

This season, according to the EHS Band website, involves two evening rehearsals per week along with daily in-class rehearsals and at least one performance or competition per week. In the month of September, there are six scheduled events, including the Tiger Ambush Classic and a competition in O’Fallon.

Although this requires a lot of work from the band members, they are enthusiastic for the upcoming season and the opportunities it holds that were unavailable last year. 

“My junior year, marching band was changed by COVID,” senior percussionist Cole Reinking said, “with us having a reduced band camp and no official season or football games.”

  Everything is back on schedule this year and new opportunities are available that Reinking said weren’t available for many years. According to senior clarinetist Zaria Lane, the musicians are working harder than ever to prepare shows with stronger music and visuals to make up for the year of performances lost. 

But the transition from band during remote learning poses a challenge for students. According to Reinking, last school year involved a reduced band camp and limited performances. This resulted in motivation issues in some students such as Lane, who admitted that she practiced very little during the limited season. 

“Before COVID-19, about a couple times a week, I would usually stay after school for any amount of time between 15 minutes and two hours practicing,” Lane said. She recalled that in years before COVID it was easier for her to have a good place to practice and get help from her peers. During remote learning, she said that not only did she not have these resources, but she also lacked the overall motivation to practice due to the lack of performances.

However, now that the band season is mostly back to normal, Lane is back to working hard to perfect her pieces. Reinking and Lane agreed that the satisfaction of completing a performance, along with the excitement of receiving awards, is their main source of motivation.

Lane is very optimistic for these upcoming performances, saying, “I think the band is going to have its best season yet with the way things are progressing.”