Post Malone’s ‘Hollywood’s Bleeding’ Underperforms

Hannah Thompson, Staff Writer

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Post Malone recently released his third album, “Hollywood’s Bleeding.” While the album has plenty of noise, it is entirely lacking in substance.

Despite his harsh exterior, Malone has surprisingly become more of a pop star than a rapper. His new album is possibly the most relevant example of this.

“Post owns and operates the refined trap-pop vibe, the polished gem of hip-hop,” Variety Magazine said.

Although Post Malone’s pop rap hybrid is not my preferred taste in music, I did my best to receive the album with an open mind.

While I was surprised by how melodic and often thoughtful many of the songs were on the album, I was disappointed to find that tracks such as “Allergic” and “Circles” had the same feeling as any other pop song with no unique quality or voice.

But those songs were a far better attempt at originality than the track “Saint Tropez.” The song was filled with meaningless and materialistic lyrics about money and fame that epitomize the recent trap genre. The song can be summed up by vapid lyrics such as “What you call holiday, I call another day,” and “I’m so rich, abs like Abercrombie Fitch.”

Algorithmic lyrics such as these lack any substance at all.

One of the few redeeming aspects of the album is the diversity of feature artists that Post Malone includes. DaBaby, Future, Halsey, Meek Mill, Lil Baby, Ozzy Osbourne, Travis Scott, SZA and Swae Lee all made appearances on the album, providing some relief from Post’s uninspired sound.

Ozzy Osbourne’s appearance on the album was particularly surprising as he joined Travis Scott in one of the more compelling songs, “Take What You Want.”  If nothing else, I applaud Malone for his creativity and boldness in sources.

All of the songs had one thing in common: they were nothing new. Post Malone did not do anything particularly innovative on this album and left me feeling underwhelmed.

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